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Featured Projects

PLUS 628: Urban Planning and Social Policy (Fall 2006)

By David Sloane

On 09, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PLUS 628: Urban Planning and Social Policy (Fall 2006)

Description

Social policy and urban planning are inextricably linked. Transportation, economic, and other policies shape the structure of the metropolis. Access to health care, quality education, healthy food and recreation is influenced by the neighborhood in which we live.

This course examines the intersection of urban planning and social policy. At times, we focus on policy development and implementation. At other times, we explore land use regulation and environmental influences on healthy living. In all cases, though, we will be looking for links, connections, and bridges between planning and policy.

When/Where

RGL 215, Thursdays, 6-9:20pm

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PLDV 210G: Animals and the Moral Landscape (Fall 1995)

By David Sloane

On 09, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PLDV 210G: Animals and the Moral Landscape (Fall 1995)

Description

Animals play a integral part in our everyday lives. We kill and eat animals; we wear their skins; we hurt and kill them to learn about dangers to our health; we cherish them as pets; we cage them for our education; and we race them for sport. In each activity, humans make certain assumptions about animals and their place in the moral landscape. Each activity is at center an ethical decision, even if it is made implicitly.

When/Where

VKC 100, Tuesday/Thursday, 9:30-11pm

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PPD 100M: Los Angeles, The Enduring Pueblo (Spring 2003)

By David Sloane

On 09, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PPD 100M: Los Angeles, The Enduring Pueblo (Spring 2003)

Description

Until very recently, when most Americans thought of Los Angeles, they did not image a multiracial metropolis. Instead, Hollywood’s portrait of LA shaped their imagination with visions of Jack Webb, the Nelson family, Beaver and his brother, the Brady Bunch, and Donna Reed. Blacks, especially after the catastrophic Watts Revolt or Riot, depending upon your perspective, were viewed as intruders into the suburban dream of Los Angeles. The Japanese, Chinese, and most remarkably of all, the Mexicans and other Latinos, were virtually invisible.

The city’s history is often told in a similar manner. That’s too bad since it means that some of the most fascinating history of the city, and its economic, cultural and political growth, is ignored or obscured. This course attempts to recapture some of that history, providing students with a more comprehensive history of the city and the region by looking at the interplay between the people who built Los Angeles. The story is at times tragic and painful, at others inspirational. Throughout that history is the foundation for today’s city, with its opportunities and challenges.

When/Where

101 Lewis Hall, Monday/Wednesday, 10-11:50am

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PLDV 100M: Los Angeles, The Enduring Pueblo (Spring 1999)

By David Sloane

On 09, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PLDV 100M: Los Angeles, The Enduring Pueblo (Spring 1999)

Description

Until very recently, when most Americans thought of Los Angeles, they did not image a multiracial metropolis. Instead, Hollywood’s portrait of LA shaped their imagination with visions of Jack Webb, the Nelson family, Beaver and his brother, the Brady Bunch, and Donna Reed. The view was black and white, and not just in the early days before color television. Blacks, especially after the catastrophic Watts Revolt (or Riot, depending upon your perspective), were intruders into the suburban dream of Los Angeles. The Japanese, Chinese, and most remarkably of all, the Mexicans and other Latinos, were virtually invisible.

The city’s history is often told in a similar manner. That’s too bad since it means that some of the most fascinating history of the city, and its economic, cultural and political growth, is ignored or obscured. This course attempts to recapture some of that history, providing students with a more comprehensive history of the city and the region by looking at the interplay between the people who built Los Angeles. The story is at times tragic and painful, at others inspirational. Throughout that history is the foundation for today’s city, with its opportunities and challenges.

When/Where

MRF 340, Monday/Wednesday, 8:30-10am

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PPD 245: The Urban Context for Policy and Planning (Fall 2006)

By David Sloane

On 09, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PPD 245: The Urban Context for Policy and Planning (Fall 2006)

Description

We live in an urban world. The number of urban residents worldwide is already more than half, and it is constantly growing. The lives and activities of public policy analysts, planners, government officials, real estate developers, community organizers, and business leaders are shaped by this metropolitan world.

This course examines the twentieth and twenty-first century urban world as the context for policy and planning. We will explore the historical development of the urban world, its spatial and economic structure, its natural and human environments, the demographic and social processes that drive the ongoing transformation of the places we live, and the policies and regulations that mediate our dreams and aspirations.

When/Where

RGL 219, Monday/Wednesday, 10-11:50am

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PLUS 533: History of Planning and Urban Form (Fall 2008)

By David Sloane

On 09, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PLUS 533: History of Planning and Urban Form (Fall 2008)

Description

While humans have been planning cities since the beginning of the urban era, only recently has a distinct profession of (city and) urban planning emerged. Understanding the history of a profession is an important component of any professional education. This course provides an overview of planning history, focusing on the United States.

When/Where

RGL 105, Thursday, 10am or RGL 209, Thursday, 4pm

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PLUS 599: American Cultural Landscapes (Summer 2000)

By David Sloane

On 09, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PLUS 599: American Cultural Landscapes (Summer 2000)

Description

This reading and research seminar explores the ordinary landscapes of America’s cities since roughly 1880. Drawing upon a variety of readings and site visits, the class will engage in discussions about the historical development of these landscapes. We shall discuss the role of social class, gender, ethnicity and race in shaping these places, and the organization of cultural space by individuals, groups and governments. Los Angeles shall serve as our landscape, but the readings will discuss examples from a wide range of American places.

When/Where

Monday/Wednesday, 3-5:20pm

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PLDV 426: History and Development of Cities (Fall 2000)

By David Sloane

On 02, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PLDV 426: History and Development of Cities (Fall 2000)

Description

How have cities changed in the last 5000, 500, or 50 years? This course introduces students to the sweep of urban history by examining shifting patterns of development, expansion, social relationships, and economic activities. We trace the evolution of the city’s form and development through the ancient world, medieval Europe, and modern America. Examples are taken primarily from the Western experience.

Within the context of that chronological evolution, we are going to examine the current polemical discussion around city form, represented by the term “sprawl.” Many policymakers and urban reformers are convinced that the current urban structure sets the stage for ecological disaster and social alienation. By looking at the evolution of the city as a place, perhaps we can better understand the roots of this reform movement, as well as the historical context for the contemporary form of the city.

Students will be asked to read a series of articles, book chapters and books about the historical development of the city. The class structure will be lecture and discussion, with regular class participation by students regarding the readings and their views on the issues raised by the lectures and readings.

Students will be required to complete a final examination and two written assignments along with regular participation in the class. The first assignment is related to Italo Calvino’s novel Invisible Cities. The second is a short research project on sprawl in contemporary America.

When/Where

Monday/Wednesday, 12-1:50pm

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PPD 245: The Urban Context for Policy and Planning (Fall 2007)

By David Sloane

On 02, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PPD 245: The Urban Context for Policy and Planning (Fall 2007)

Description

We live in an urban world. The number of urban residents worldwide is already more than half, and it is constantly growing. The lives and activities of public policy analysts, planners, government officials, real estate developers, community organizers, and business leaders are shaped by this metropolitan world.

This course examines the twentieth and twenty-first century urban world as the context for policy and planning. We will explore the historical development of the urban world, its spatial and economic structure, its natural and human environments, the demographic and social processes that drive the ongoing transformation of the places we live, and the policies and regulations that mediate our dreams and aspirations.

When/Where

RGL 100, Monday/Wednesday, 10-11:50am

PDF

PPDE 630: Community Health Planning (Spring 2013)

By David Sloane

On 01, Aug 2013 | In | By David Sloane

PPDE 630: Community Health Planning (Spring 2013)

Description

In recent years, urban planning and public health professionals have recognized the role the planning profession plays in sustaining community health. During much of the twentieth century, public health professionals believed that the key to community health was an individual’s health. If we focus on individuals, and improve their health, we would improve the community’s health. However, starting in the 1970s, the context or environment in which individuals live their lives, make their behavioral decisions, once again was recognized as influencing health outcomes. Concerns about tobacco and lead, then obesity, have reinforced theoretical concepts about the role of environment in sustaining individual health.

This course examines the complicated relationship of health and environment by exploring the development, conceptualization, and practice of community health planning over the last generation. The course will examine community health planning from a variety of perspectives, including urban design, transportation, social/community, and economic development. The course assignments revolve around the practice of community health planning. In class, we will discuss theory and conceptualization, while in the assignments, you will be applying tools and concepts in the field.

When/Where

RGL 209, Wednesday, 2:00-5:20pm

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